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Voices for Creative Nonviolence has deep, long-standing roots in active nonviolent resistance to U.S. war-making. Begun in the summer of 2005, Voices draws upon the experiences of those who challenged the brutal economic sanctions imposed by the U.S. and U.N. against the Iraqi people between 1990 and 2003. More about Voices

recent additions at a glance

Hancock Drone Resister Jack Gilroy Sentencing October 1 in DeWitt, NYDrone protestor facing one year in prison
The Real Reason We Are Bombing SyriaColumn by Dennis Kucinich
Afghan Youth Travel to IndiaInternational Youth Camp on Nonviolence
Saddam and ChurchillComparing the careers of Saddam and Churchill, written 9 years ago
Lessons Learned in the Bucca Camp Kathy Kelly remembers visiting a U.S.-run POW camp in Iraq in 2004
There Is No Future in War: Youth Rise Up, a Manifesto the youth of America are taking a stand against war

Hancock Drone Resister Jack Gilroy Sentencing October 1 in DeWitt, NY

Gilroy’s trial was based on participation in a solemn funeral procession and die-in to illustrate the death and destruction of innocent people by drone missiles and bombs fired out of MQ9 Reaper drones piloted from Hancock Air Force Base. near Syracuse, NY. Hancock is one of many drone bases around the United States doing assassinations of Muslim suspects in foreign nations.

The Real Reason We Are Bombing Syria

by Dennis Kucinich
reposted from the Huffington Post

The administration’s response to the conjunction of this weekend’s People’s Climate March and the International Day of Peace?

1) Bomb Syria the following day, to wrest control of the oil from ISIS which gained its foothold directly in the region through the U.S., Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Turkey and Jordan funding and arming ISIS’ predecessors in Syria.

2) Send the president to UN General Assembly, where he will inevitably give a rousing speech about climate and peace, while the destruction of the environment and the shattering of world peace is on full display 5,000 miles away.

Afghan Youth Travel to India

Six of the Afghan Peace Volunteers went to Delhi for an International Youth Camp on Nonviolence. They also visited and stayed at the Gandhian ashram called Ekta Parishad. Read the photo-journal here.

World Peace Gong: New DelhiWorld Peace Gong: New Delhi

Saddam and Churchill

Use of weapons of mass destruction is a crime to be condemned without restraint, no matter who is the perpetrator or who is the victim and I do not write to defend Saddam. It is a society imbued with racism, however, that celebrates Winston Churchill as a great man in history while it vilifies, condemns and, presumably, executes Saddam Hussein.

Lessons Learned in the Bucca Camp

In January of 2004 I visited “Bucca Camp,” a U.S.-run POW camp named for a firefighter lost in the 2001 collapse of New York’s World Trade Center. Located near the isolated port city of Umm Qasr, in southern Iraq, the network of tent prisons had been constructed by U.S. Coalition authorities. Friends of five young men thought to be imprisoned there had begged our three-person Voices delegation to try and visit the camp and find out what had happened to their loved ones.

There Is No Future in War: Youth Rise Up, a Manifesto

Once again, US politicians and pundits are beating the drums of war, trying to get our nation involved in yet another conflict. A few years ago it was Iran, with “all options on the table.” Last year it was a red line that threatened to drag us into the conflict in Syria. This time it’s Iraq.

We, the youth of America, have grown up in war, war war. War has become the new norm for our generation. But these conflicts–declared by older people but fought and paid for by young people–are robbing us of our future and we’re tired of it.

There is no future in war.

On Worthier Victims

The shooting of a general at a training facility is seen as more vile than breaking down the door and shooting into a family home. Beheading one’s victims becomes more disgusting than burning them alive with a hellfire missile or with white phosphorous. And for some reason, I haven’t heard Dick Cheney on the radio saying that ISIS waterboarding is not torture.

If we could somehow put aside the double-standards, what would the picture in Iraq look like?

Two facts would not be in doubt: ISIS is a murderous threat to the people in its immediate vicinity and U.S. military force has often been a murderous threat to people in its immediate vicinity and beyond.

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