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Voices for Creative Nonviolence has deep, long-standing roots in active nonviolent resistance to U.S. war-making. Begun in the summer of 2005, Voices draws upon the experiences of those who challenged the brutal economic sanctions imposed by the U.S. and U.N. against the Iraqi people between 1990 and 2003. More about Voices

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Drones and Discrimination: Kick the HabitKathy Kelly sees opportunity on being sentenced to 3 months in prison
Missouri Judge Convicts and Sentences Two Peace Activists for Protesting Drone Warfareat Whiteman Air Force Base
Spending Time with People Trapped and Impoverished by Endless War Abroad and at HomeKathy Kelly Interviewed on NPR Worldview
Drones on Trialat Federal Court in Jefferson City Dec. 10
Hancock Drone Resister Jack Gilroy RELEASEDfrom Jamesville Correctional Facility
Climate Change ChallengesSupport the Environment or the U.S. Military?

Drones and Discrimination: Kick the Habit

On December 10, International Human Rights Day, federal Magistrate Matt Whitworth sentenced me to three months in prison for having crossed the line at a military base that wages drone warfare. The punishment for our attempt to speak on behalf of trapped and desperate people, abroad, will be an opportunity to speak with people trapped by prisons and impoverishment here in the U.S.

Missouri Judge Convicts and Sentences Two Peace Activists for Protesting Drone Warfare

Jefferson City, MO— On December 10, a federal magistrate found Georgia Walker, of Kansas City, MO and Chicagoan Kathy Kelly guilty of criminal trespass to a military installation as a result of their June 1 effort to deliver a loaf of bread and a citizens’ indictment of drone warfare to authorities at Whiteman AFB. Judge Matt Whitworth sentenced Kelly to three months in prison and Walker to one year of supervised probation.

In testimony, Kelly, who recently returned from Afghanistan, recounted her conversation with an Afghan mother whose son, a recent police academy graduate, was killed by a drone as he sat with colleagues in a garden. “I’m educated and humbled by experiences talking with people who’ve been trapped and impoverished by U.S. warfare,” said Kelly. “The U.S. prison system also traps and impoverishes people. In coming months, I’ll surely learn more about who goes to prison and why.”

Drones on Trial

For immediate release: Dec. 5, 2014

‘Drones on Trial’ at federal court in Jefferson City Dec. 10

On International Human Rights Day, Dec. 10, two peace activists, charged with criminal trespass, will be tried in Jefferson City, Mo. The charge is based on an action at Whiteman Air Force Base last June 1st protesting U.S. use of weaponized drones which are remotely piloted from the base. The trial testimony is expected to reflect a Nov. 24, 2014, report that for every intended target of a U.S. drone strike, 28 unidentified persons are also killed. Drones change the nature of warfare, turning whole regions into battlefields where merely suspected militants, often uninvolved in combat, are identified and executed, without trial, from obscuring distances and with no chance to surrender.

Kathy Kelly, left, and Georgia Walker on June 1 offer Whiteman AFB guards “the bread of peace” and an indictment of all U.S. drone warfare. The guards took the bread, not the indictment, and took Kelly and Walker into custody for about an hour.Kathy Kelly, left, and Georgia Walker on June 1 offer Whiteman AFB guards “the bread of peace” and an indictment of all U.S. drone warfare. The guards took the bread, not the indictment, and took Kelly and Walker into custody for about an hour.

Hancock Drone Resister Jack Gilroy RELEASED

Jack Gilroy, 79, of Endwell, NY, was released from Jamesville Correctional Facility on November 28. Gilroy, a former high school teacher and long-time peace and justice activist, was convicted in the Town of DeWitt Court this past July.

Gilroy was sentenced to three months by Judge Robert Jokl after Gilroy and 30 others did a “die-in” outside the main gate of the 174th Attack Wing of the NYS Air National Guard at Hancock Air Base just outside Syracuse.

Climate Change Challenges

Having lived through the 1991 Desert Storm bombing and the 2003 Shock and Awe bombing in Iraq, I tread carefully when speaking about any danger greater than war that children in our world might face. I won’t forget children in Baghdadi hospitals whose bodies I have seen, wounded and maimed, after bombing campaigns ordered by U.S. leaders. I think also of children in Lebanon and Gaza and Afghanistan, children I’ve sat with in cities under heavy bombardments while their frightened parents tried to distract and calm them.

Even so, it seems the greatest danger – the greatest violence – that any of us face is contained in our attacks on our environment. Today’s children and generations to follow them face nightmares of scarcity, disease, mass displacement, social chaos, and war, due to our patterns of consumption and pollution.

Not Again

Why is it that after 13 years of Operation Enduring Freedom, more than 4000 Afghans have set themselves on fire in 2014, and another 4000 have tried to poison themselves?

You recall some principles drilled into your training, that if necessary, you ought to “shoot everything that moves.”

You get irritated because a few boisterous-looking teenage boys appear too defiant, standing in front of women in burqas and girls who are crying quietly.

You hear some shuffles in the next room, and you instinctively pull the trigger.

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