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Voices for Creative Nonviolence has deep, long-standing roots in active nonviolent resistance to U.S. war-making. Begun in the summer of 2005, Voices draws upon the experiences of those who challenged the brutal economic sanctions imposed by the U.S. and U.N. against the Iraqi people between 1990 and 2003. More about Voices

recent additions at a glance

Saddam and ChurchillComparing the careers of Saddam and Churchill, written 9 years ago
Lessons Learned in the Bucca Camp Kathy Kelly remembers visiting a U.S.-run POW camp in Iraq in 2004
There Is No Future in War: Youth Rise Up, a Manifesto the youth of America are taking a stand against war
On Worthier VictimsGetting Beyond Disinformation Around ISIS
A Teacher in KabulA story of hope from Afghanistan
Privilege and CourageSherri Maurin's further reflections from Kabul

Illinois: 3 Occupation Project related articles from The Daily Journal

Braam, 2 others arrested for the third time

By Lee Provost
The Daily Journal
Aug 24, 2007

Manhattan’s Bob Braam was arrested for a third time Tuesday, this time outside of U.S. Sen. Richard Durbin’s Chicago office.

Chicago -- 3 Arrests at Senator Durbin's Office

August 21, 2007

Three social justice advocates with the “Occupation Project” visited Senator Durbin’s Chicago office seeking his pledge to vote against any additional Iraq war funding beyond that required for the immediate and safe withdrawal of U.S. troops. They were arrested by federal authorities and charged with causing a disturbance.

“As a minister, I believe that we have a moral imperative to end our country’s occupation of Iraq,” says Le Anne Clausen, a seminarian at Chicago Theological Seminary. “I was a human rights worker in Iraq, investigating U.S. abuse of Iraqi prisoners during the first year of the occupation, including abuse at Abu Ghraib. It is our actions that did the most to put us in this terrible mess, and we have no hope of the situation healing until we leave Iraq.”

Beyond the Rhetoric of Withdrawal: Our Unknown Air War Over Iraq

August 23, 2007

A key element of the drawdown plans, not mentioned in the President’s public statements, is that the departing American troops will be replaced by American airpower.

….

The American air war inside Iraq is perhaps the most significant – and underreported – aspect of the fight against the insurgency.

-– Seymour M. Hersh, “Up in the Air,” Nov. 29, 2005, New Yorker

There’s an air war over Iraq. It’s invisible (here). It’s deadly (there).

We Shouldn’t Be Causing This

Amman, Jordan
August 22, 2007

Here in Amman, Jordan, a British teenager, Sonia, age 12, recently spent four days interviewing and befriending Iraqi youngsters close to her in age. She wanted to learn, firsthand, about the experiences of Iraqi youngsters who have fled war and violence in their home country.

A versatile and talented child, Sonia loves to play the trumpet and perform classical Indian dances, the latter being somewhat unusual for a Muslim girl. When she was eight years old, shortly before the U.S. and the U.K. attacked Iraq, she wrote a poem urging respect for the rights of Iraqi children whose lives and hopes would be destroyed by war. The poem reached many people, intensifying efforts of peace activists to stop the war before it started. Sonia continued her efforts on behalf of Iraqi children, even founding an organization called “Children Against War.”

Antiwar Activists Arrested at Chicago Federal Building

August 15, 2007

Shortly after noon today, federal authorities and Chicago police arrested four antiwar activists at the Kluczynski Federal Building in Chicago. Four advocates are currently being held and processed by the Chicago police department on a state charge of trespassing.

Those arrested sought a public pledge from Senators Durbin and Obama to vote against any additional funding for the Iraq war. President Bush is seeking approximately $150 billion in Iraq - Afghanistan war funding for Fiscal Year 2008.

Get To Work!

Amman, Jordan
August 13, 2007

“GET A JOB!” These three words are very familiar to activists bearing signs calling for an end to war, whether standing on street corners, walking along highways, holding vigils, or nonviolently occupying the offices of elected representatives. Listen to the activists, and you’ll often hear, “We’re doing our job. We’re trying.”

I’m convinced that our work must always have one foot placed in nonviolent resistance to the forces that design and wage wars, with the other foot standing among people who bear the physical and mental affliction caused by these forces. Today, I’m thinking especially about two young women who found themselves in nightmare circumstances because, in their view, they simply wanted to have a job.

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