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Voices for Creative Nonviolence has deep, long-standing roots in active nonviolent resistance to U.S. war-making. Begun in the summer of 2005, Voices draws upon the experiences of those who challenged the brutal economic sanctions imposed by the U.S. and U.N. against the Iraqi people between 1990 and 2003. More about Voices

recent additions at a glance

Drones and Discrimination: Kick the HabitKathy Kelly sees opportunity on being sentenced to 3 months in prison
Missouri Judge Convicts and Sentences Two Peace Activists for Protesting Drone Warfareat Whiteman Air Force Base
Spending Time with People Trapped and Impoverished by Endless War Abroad and at HomeKathy Kelly Interviewed on NPR Worldview
Drones on Trialat Federal Court in Jefferson City Dec. 10
Hancock Drone Resister Jack Gilroy RELEASEDfrom Jamesville Correctional Facility
Climate Change ChallengesSupport the Environment or the U.S. Military?

Rep Dave Obey -- 3 Arrests at Superior, WI Office

March 14, 2007

Three arrested for trespassing in Obey’s Superior office after protest
Anna Kurth, Forum Communications Company
Published Wednesday, March 14, 2007

Three Iraq War protesters were arrested when they refused to leave the Superior office of U.S. Rep. David Obey, D-Wausau when the office closed at 5 p.m. Tuesday.

Senator Hillary Clinton -- 4 Arrests in Albany, NY

March 12, 2007

Four activists from the Saratoga (NY) Peace Alliance’s Occupation Project were arrested this afternoon (March 12, 2007) after occupying Sen. Clinton’s office at the Federal Building in Albany NY.

At 3 pm sixteen members representing various peace groups from the Albany area had a meeting with Tracey Brooks, Ms Clinton’s Political Director for our region. This was the third time we had met with Ms Brooks since last fall.

Occupation Project in Washington, D.C. - March 26 to 29

No Business Before the People’s Business – End the War Now!
Nonviolent Direct Actions to Stop the Supplemental War Budget in Washington, D.C.
March 26 – 29

The election that shifted the balance of power in Congress last fall was based on one thing: the American people’s rejection of the Iraq war and the policies behind it. Yet many Democrats, as well as Republicans, refuse to heed the will of the American people, and Congress is poised to approve another $93 billion – or more – in supplemental spending that will continue and even expand the war.

The National Campaign for Nonviolent Resistance, in coordination with Voices for Creative Nonviolence and the Occupation Project, is organizing several days of nonviolent direct action tied to the U.S. Senate’s consideration of the Iraq war supplemental budget, currently expected at the end of March.

Iraq/Iran Interview with Milan Rai

March 9, 2007

By Milan Rai
Foreign Policy

Exclusively to ukwatch.net an interview with Milan Rai, activist and author on the continuing disaster in Iraq and the likelihood of an anglo/american assault on Iran.

Read the Interview on ukwatch.net

Associated Press: War Protesters Target Lawmakers' Offices

Friday March 9, 2007 6:31 AM
By JENNIFER C. KERR
Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) - Some opponents of the Iraq war are taking their protests straight to Congress - staging “occupations” in lawmakers’ offices on Capitol Hill and in their home communities.

Rep. Rahm Emanuel’s office in Chicago was targeted on Thursday.

A day earlier protesters were headed off before getting into House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s office in San Francisco.

In Washington, peace activists dressed in pink showed up recently at the Senate offices of presidential hopefuls John McCain and Hillary Rodham Clinton.

The protesters haven’t abandoned the larger, more familiar gatherings at college campuses, major cities and monuments in Washington. But in recent weeks, they have been turning up at congressional offices, vowing to stay until they get pledges that lawmakers will vote against more war funding - or until they are forcibly removed.

Occupation Project Protests and Arrests at: Representative Udall, Senator Salazar and Representative Degette Offices

March 9, 2007

Photos by Phil Weinstein: the Rocky Mountain Peace and Justice CenterPhoto by Phil Weinstein: the Rocky Mountain Peace and Justice Center

For more photos and the press release, including personal statements from those arrested:

Tom Fox: For the Sake of Our Children

March 9 2007

Tom Fox at the Syrian borderTom Fox at the Syrian border

One year ago, friend and colleague of Voices, Tom Fox was confirmed dead in a Baghdad neighborhood. On November 26th, 2005, Fox and three colleagues - Jim Loney, Harmeet Sooden and Norman Kember - were abducted in Baghdad. It was sometimes difficult during that time to work with the same spirit as Tom and to be as ceaseless as he was in working with and for the people of Iraq and Palestine. Tom accompanied refugees, documented detainee abuses, and advocated for the human rights of all. What has Tom Fox left for us all? Milan Rai says it best in a “Poem for Tom”:

Where there is courage
Tom Fox lives
Where there is strength
Tom Fox lives

Where there is compassion
Tom Fox lives
Where there is faith
Tom Fox lives

In millions of fiery hearts
Tom Fox lives
In the prisons of Iraq
Tom Fox lives

What did Tom work towards, why did Tom work so ceaselessly, and how did he not give in to despair? As it is, Tom wrote quite a bit in the time he spent in Iraq, and it is probably best to let him answer these questions.

For the Sake of Our Children

By Tom Fox
June 21 2005

A colleague and I walked to a shop to pick up an order. The shop owner told us how very depressed she is regarding the ongoing security and infrastructure crisis in Iraq. She feels, as do many Iraqis, that things are getting worse not better. She said she is beginning to feel as if her life has no meaning beyond working nine hours a day, six days a week. A co-worker did not dispute her assessment of the situation but made an impassioned plea never to give up hope for a better future. And even more importantly to never stop working to help bring that better future to come to pass. The co-worker concluded by saying, “Things probably won’t get better in my lifetime but I will keep working to make things better for the sake of our children.”

Our apartment is across the street from a park. Many evenings around the time we are gathering for supper a mother and her three children walk by our living room window. The western sun illuminates her face and the faces of her young children. I don’t know her but in a way I feel I do. She looks tired. So many, many people here in Iraq are so very tired. She looks a bit fearful. Will today be the day when the insurgents set off a car bomb near the park? Will today be the day when the young men of the Iraqi National Guard, riding like cowboys in the back of their pickup trucks, get trigger happy and start shooting with her and her children in the line of fire? Yet day after day I see her taking her children to the park. Underneath the fatigue and the fear I can sense the hope and the courage in her heart. It reflects on her children as does the setting sun reflect on the nearby Tigris River. She gives me courage to face the overwhelming difficulties of life in this broken land. She is living in the present moment fully aware of the dangers and uncertainties and yet she has not given up hope, she has not given in to despair, she has not let herself be driven into hiding by men with guns and bombs. She is my teacher. She teaches me how to live fully conscious of the horrors of today and still be able to envision a future of promise, peace and plenty. I would pray that we all live each day, no matter where we are, “for the sake of our children.”

For more about Tom Fox see the Christian Peacemaker Teams website

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