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Voices for Creative Nonviolence has deep, long-standing roots in active nonviolent resistance to U.S. war-making. Begun in the summer of 2005, Voices draws upon the experiences of those who challenged the brutal economic sanctions imposed by the U.S. and U.N. against the Iraqi people between 1990 and 2003. More about Voices

recent additions at a glance

Machines of WarA piece by Eric Vincent, DePaul Intern at VCNV
CrosscurrentsKathy Kelly writes on environmental and social activsm on and off Jeju Island
St Patrick's Day Greetings from PrisonKathy's St Patrick Day message from prison
Possibility of EscapeKathy Kelly writes from Lexington FMC
TV Ad Airing in Las Vegas Asks Drone Pilots to Refuse to FlyStop the Killing, End Drone Warfare!
Obama Plays Hardball With Israel…for OnceExposing Israel's Secret Nuclear Program

Learning from _American Sniper_

American Sniper is a racist, militaristic movie. But it has much to teach us if we want to build a successful antiwar movement.















Peace Activists Encourage Alabamians to Join a Protest

By Kay Campbell, writer for AL.com

HUNTSVILLE, Alabama - Want to feel less discouraged about the disarray and violence in the world? Then join a protest movement, say Kathy Kelly, co-coordinator of Voices for Creative Nonviolence, and Medea Benjamin, co-founder of Code Pink, a pro-peace group originally organized by mothers against war.

Kathy and Medea: photo by Kay CampbellKathy and Medea: photo by Kay Campbell

Poet-Journalists and Central Questions

Where Days Are Stones: Afghanistan and Gaza PoemsWhere Days Are Stones: Afghanistan and Gaza Poems

By Gary Steven Corseri

I have pondered lately about the world’s need for poet-journalists. (The hyphen is key here.) There are many great journalists who venture into terra incognita in order to tell the true stories of the victims of war, violence, poverty, ignorance, disease. Some of them, placing themselves “in the line of fire,” have been “killed in action,”– sometimes by “friendly fire”– while “just doing their jobs.” And, there are poets and artists in America who eschew the ease and comforts of an academic position– the foundation grants, the sinecures– because they are driven to sing their unique songs while they live– come hell or high water! (“There is some $#@& I will not eat!” wrote e.e. cummings).

Pakistan Witness on Trial in DeWitt for Drone Resistance

On April 28, 2013, Ms. Mahoney was arrested when she joined 27 others in a die-in outside the front gate of Hancock Air Base, to protest their piloting of Reaper drones. Six months earlier Ms. Mahoney had traveled Pakistan to meet with families of drone victims. She stated:

“I was ashamed to say I live in a country that participates in terrorizing and killing of innocent people; where the killing of children is viewed as collateral damage.”

Terrorism “Insurance” Expires

In 2002, at a time when insurance providers were unwilling to provide coverage for losses resulting from acts of terrorism, and when construction and utility companies were stalling in their development projects, Congress passed the Terrorism Risk Insurance Act (TRIA). They decided to socialize some of the financial risk, giving a federal government guarantee on insurance payouts exceeding 100 million dollars.

Over the next 12 years, Presidents Bush and Obama and six different Congresses made countless decisions to increase the risk of terrorism (and of a bailout under TRIA). Of course, the most brutally profound effects of those decisions were imposed on children, women, and men in other parts of the world. Likely the least affected people were the ones complaining in the business sections of major papers last month.

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