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Voices for Creative Nonviolence has deep, long-standing roots in active nonviolent resistance to U.S. war-making. Begun in the summer of 2005, Voices draws upon the experiences of those who challenged the brutal economic sanctions imposed by the U.S. and U.N. against the Iraqi people between 1990 and 2003. More about Voices

recent additions at a glance

Peace Activists Encourage Alabamians to Join a ProtestKathy Kelly and Medea Benjamin speak in Huntsville
Poet-Journalists and Central QuestionsA Review of David Smith-Ferri’s "Where Days Are Stones"
Pakistan Witness on Trial in DeWitt for Drone Resistance Since 2010 there have been more than 150 arrests at Hancock
Terrorism “Insurance” ExpiresSomething Ended January 1, But It Wasn't the Afghanistan War
Abolishing the CIARelease the Whole Report, Senator Udall!
Formal End of Afghanistan War Not Really the EndSimply a Change of Definitions

Afghan Malnutrition - The Search for Solutions

by IRIN, humanitarian news and analysis, a service of the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs

JALALABAD, 11 November 2014 (IRIN) - Abdullah’s wails of pain are punctuated only by his rasping cough. His arms bound to his body, he is five months old but weighs just 3.2kg, lighter than some newborns. In the next bed, three-month old Shukoria looks withered and worn, her face wrinkled and pained.

Both are suffering from malnutrition, which affects more than 40 percent of Afghan children, killing thousands every year and leaving millions with permanent disabilities.

Left in the Dark: International Military Operations in Afghanistan

Reproduced from Amnesty International

Thousands of Afghan civilians have been killed since 2001 by international forces, and thousands more have been injured. This report examines the record of accountability for civilian deaths caused by international military operations in the five-year period from 2009 to 2013. In particular, it focuses on the performance of the US government in investigating possible war crimes and in prosecuting those suspected of criminal responsibility for such crimes. Its overall finding is that the record is poor.

Full Report

On The List

These heavy quilts, stuffed with wool, can make the difference between life and death during Kabul’s extremely harsh winters. For the past two winters, the APVs have relied on women in their local area to manufacture thousands of duvets which are then distributed free of charge. The women are paid a living wage for their labor.

The Fourth Estate in Flames

by Medea Benjamin

A war-weary American public that a year ago resoundingly rejected US military intervention in Syria to overthrow the Assad regime now is rallying behind the use of force to destroy the so-called Islamic State (ISIS). In just three months, from June to September, support for US airstrikes in Iraq soared from 45% percent to 71%, and to 65% for airstrikes in Syria.

How did such an astounding turnabout occur? Certainly it wasn’t due to the persuasive powers of President Obama, who seems to have been reluctantly dragged into a conflict that he once acknowledged has no military solution.

The credit for selling Obama’s war on ISIS must go to the mainstream American media.

Write to Imprisoned Drone Protester Jack Gilroy

John P. Gilroy #14001694
Jamesville Correctional Facility
6660 E Seneca Turnpike
Jamesville, NY 13078

release date: 11/29/14

Please send no packages, only letters.

My Father Was Killed by a Computer, Says 7-Year-Old Afghan Child

by Dr. Hakim

Imal, a 7 year old Afghan student in the 2nd grade, came to visit us in Kabul.

As Imal grew up, he kept asking his mother where his father was. His mother finally told Imal that his father had been killed by a drone when he was still a baby.

If you could see Imal in this video, you would want to hug Imal immediately.

If Imal were a white American kid, this tragedy would not have befallen his father. Which American would allow any U.S. citizen to be killed by a foreign drone?

Stop the Killing

As we approach the nightmare of renewed, expanded U.S. war in Iraq, I think of Archbishop Romero’s words and example. Romero aligned himself, steadily, with the most impoverished people in El Salvador, learning about their plight by listening to them every weekend in the program he hosted on Salvadoran radio. With ringing clarity, he spoke out on their behalf, and he jeopardized his life challenging the elites, the military and the paramilitaries in El Salvador. Archbishop Oscar Romero of San SalvadorArchbishop Oscar Romero of San Salvador

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