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Voices for Creative Nonviolence has deep, long-standing roots in active nonviolent resistance to U.S. war-making. Begun in the summer of 2005, Voices draws upon the experiences of those who challenged the brutal economic sanctions imposed by the U.S. and U.N. against the Iraqi people between 1990 and 2003. More about Voices

recent additions at a glance

No to War in Gaza and Afghanistan!New video from APVs- by sharing food, we resist war
Drone Resister Sentenced to One Year in Prison- Base’s Order of Protection Begs JudgmentOn July 10, grandmother of three, Mary Anne Grady Flores was sentenced to one year in prison
Amerikistan, not Afghanistan, Warocracy, not DemocracyHakim speaks of Afghan election, John Kerry's visit and calls for "quit Afghanistan"
Women Rising Radio XXVKathy Kelly interviewed with Sister Stella Soh
Bowe Bergdahl and the Voice of WarBergdahl Listened to Conscience
Vigil and Fast in Michigan for Victims of Drone StrikesMichigan Residents Hold Vigil and Fast for Victims of Drone Strikes

A Rising Number of Children Are Dying from U.S. Explosives Littering Afghan Land

By Kevin Sieff, for the Washington Post
Published: April 9

KABUL — As the U.S. military withdraws from Afghanistan, it is leaving behind a deadly legacy: about 800 square miles of land littered with undetonated grenades, rockets and mortar shells.

#NotABugSplat: Art Installation in Pakistan Puts a Face on Drone Victims

By Elizabeth Nolan Brown of Reason Magazine
Published : April 7

A sobering and commendable art installation in Pakistan puts a face on the victims of U.S. drone attacks. The giant portrait, installed in Pakistan’s heavily bombed Khyber Pukhtoonkhwa region, features a child who lost both her parents and two siblings in a Predator drone attack.

Talks, Tears Highlight Rally Against Drones

By Jane Stoever

Bearing witness against remote control of reaper drones from U.S. military bases, about 20 protesters rallied Sunday, April 6, at the Spirit Gate entry to Whiteman Air Force Base near Knob Noster, Mo.

Noting the name Whiteman Air Force Base, former CIA intelligence analyst Ray McGovern in his talk said, “When B2 bombers flew out of here to Afghanistan and Iraq, they weren’t killing people who looked like us (white), but who were what the airmen were taught to call ‘sand niggers’ or ‘towel-heads.’ White-man is killing brown, black, and other men, women, and children who don’t look like us. White-man Air Force Base is a reflection of the American original sin, racism.”

Whiteman Air Force Base Main GateWhiteman Air Force Base Main Gate

Voting with Their Feet

It was the jolting vibrations
that shook our senses,
direction-less,
nonetheless directed by fellow humans.
Our eyes darted from mysterious fears
of losing one another.
“There’s been an explosion. Don’t come this way!”,
torn by our unspoken wish to huddle together,
as if madness could be scattered
among the fragile shells of ourselves.
as if we could
dream the unknown away.

99 Tactics of Successful Tax Resistance Campaigns

That’s the title of a new book by David M. Gross. Here’s an excerpt featuring Voices for Creative Nonviolence.

Voices will not pay a penny of this fine…. We chose to travel to Iraq in order to openly challenge our country’s war against the Iraqi people. We fully understood that our acts could result in criminal or civil charges. We acted because when our country’s government is committing a grievous, criminal act, it is incumbent upon each of us to challenge in every nonviolent manner possible the acts of the government…

Fly Kites, Not Drones!


On Saturday afternoon, community members and students met at the Voices house to celebrate Now Roz, the Persian new year, and to participate in the APV call to “Fly Kites, Not Drones.”

Mother Mariam and Habib

Mother Miriam and HabibMother Miriam and Habib

by Maya Evans

We are sitting on the floor in a simple outhouse room attached to the Afghan Peace Volunteer’s compound, the unheated space is normally used for teaching local children various classes. Habib and his mother Mariam sit in front of us motionless, Mariam wears the burqa so it is not possible to read her face and ascertain how she might be feeling, the tentative expression on Habib’s face tells us that their life is hard.

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