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Voices for Creative Nonviolence has deep, long-standing roots in active nonviolent resistance to U.S. war-making. Begun in the summer of 2005, Voices draws upon the experiences of those who challenged the brutal economic sanctions imposed by the U.S. and U.N. against the Iraqi people between 1990 and 2003. More about Voices

recent additions at a glance

Sacred Hearts, Sacred Lives: Children Crossing the BorderBuddy Bell of Voices writes from the US/Mexico border
Harassing the DronesMary Anne Gragy Flores sentenced to one year for violating order of protection
No to War in Gaza and Afghanistan!New video from APVs- by sharing food, we resist war
Drone Resister Sentenced to One Year in Prison- Base’s Order of Protection Begs JudgmentOn July 10, grandmother of three, Mary Anne Grady Flores was sentenced to one year in prison
Amerikistan, not Afghanistan, Warocracy, not DemocracyHakim speaks of Afghan election, John Kerry's visit and calls for "quit Afghanistan"
Women Rising Radio XXVKathy Kelly interviewed with Sister Stella Soh

Love, Half A World Away

Shortly after noon on the day of his funeral, I talked about Ron and his life and death with my friend Ali, one of the young Afghan Peace Volunteers whose hospitality I’ve been enjoying in Kabul this winter. Sensing my sadness, Ali listened intently. When I finally finished, he looked at me and said, “You rest. The rest of the day is free for you.” Within an hour, Ali’s concerns had found their way to the rest of the young men in our small community. Zekerullah came to our shared bedroom and lit a fire. “It’s cold in here,” was all he said. Each one of these unbelievable young men came to the room and shared his condolences for a man he’d never met.

Women’s Liberation at Barefoot College

Future Solar EngineersFuture Solar Engineers

Tilonia, India —A few months ago, the Afghan Peace Volunteers began planning to send a small delegation of young women to India as guests of Barefoot College, a renowned initiative that uses village wisdom, local knowledge and practical skills available in the rural areas to improve villagers’ lives.

Two Afghan Girls' Indian Journey to Nonviolence

Read the original blog at Our Journey to Smile.

Torpekai and Zarghuna arrive in Delhi, India: Torpekai is wearing the Borderfree Blue ScarfTorpekai and Zarghuna arrive in Delhi, India: Torpekai is wearing the Borderfree Blue Scarf

Hakim : Torpekai, where have you arrived at?
Torpekai : Delhi.
Hakim : How do you feel?
Torpekai : I feel good.
Hakim : Zarghuna? Was it a good flight?
Zarghuna : Yes, we’ve arrived safely. I feel that every place of the world has a home for human beings.

Refugee Crisis Cripples UNHCR

Sunset in AmmanSunset in Amman

The flow of Syrians into Jordan, anywhere from 500,000 to 600,000, has created a crisis. About 100,000 of these are in a camp setting, the rest in other areas. Those in the camp, I was advised from an Iraqi who works there, are mostly farmers, construction workers and people from the countryside, while the merchants and tradespeople are trying to make their living outside of the camp. “Industrious” is how everyone describes Syrians.

Kareem Khan is Free!

Kareem relayed this message: “When I was picked up I thought I would never see my family again, that I would never be free again because of all the stories I have heard about disappeared people. Now that I have been released and have seen the news, the efforts of activists, I know it is because of them that I am free, and I would like to thank them.”

Hancock 17 Released from Jail

Hancock 17 Drone War Crimes Resisters Released from Jail February 14 They say that any penalty the court imposes is trivial compared to the death sentences imposed on drone victims

In a week in which the National Security Administration’s role in the assassinations of drone victims was revealed, Pakistani anti-drone activist Kareem Khan was freed after being abducted from his home, and President Obama is considering a drone strike on yet another U.S. citizen, the twelve sentenced members of the Hancock 17 Drone War Crime Resisters were released from the “Justice” Center Jail in Syracuse, NY on Friday, February 14.

Voices on Air

Hey, so these, you know, concerns about this dramatically shocking increasing malnutrition rate, something that for instance, I’m reading this blog from Kathy Kelly, it would take 5 cents to subsidize iodized salt for one child for one year. You know the entire 4-year funding of the World Food Programme and the Global Alliance would, I mean it’d be nothing compared to what we pay to keep a U.S. soldier in Afghanistan. Can you talk about the problem and the shocking figures?

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