Home

Voices for Creative Nonviolence has deep, long-standing roots in active nonviolent resistance to U.S. war-making. Begun in the summer of 2005, Voices draws upon the experiences of those who challenged the brutal economic sanctions imposed by the U.S. and U.N. against the Iraqi people between 1990 and 2003. More about Voices

recent additions at a glance

Before the DawnCall for a new awakening
In Baghdad, Organized Destruction"Since we opened our eyes in this life, we have only known pain."
Jury Finds Four Hancock Anti-Drone Activists Guilty of Trespass, but Acquits on All Other ChargesSentencing Will Be in the De Witt (NY) Town Court 6:30pm July 8
CNN: Columbia is first U.S. university to divest from prisonsColumbia University has become the first college in the United States to divest from private prison companies, following a student activist campaign.
Their deaths shall haunt us as long as we liveEarlier this month, a drone strike in Khost City, Afghanistan killed 34 Taliban-affiliated individuals. However, local reports from the region indicate that this strike also killed 15 civilians.
Weeding Roses in Kabulby Martha Hennessy

Terrorism “Insurance” Expires

In 2002, at a time when insurance providers were unwilling to provide coverage for losses resulting from acts of terrorism, and when construction and utility companies were stalling in their development projects, Congress passed the Terrorism Risk Insurance Act (TRIA). They decided to socialize some of the financial risk, giving a federal government guarantee on insurance payouts exceeding 100 million dollars.

Over the next 12 years, Presidents Bush and Obama and six different Congresses made countless decisions to increase the risk of terrorism (and of a bailout under TRIA). Of course, the most brutally profound effects of those decisions were imposed on children, women, and men in other parts of the world. Likely the least affected people were the ones complaining in the business sections of major papers last month.

Abolishing the CIA

By Robert C. Koehler

The shock resonating from the Senate Intelligence Committee’s CIA torture report isn’t due so much to the revelations themselves, grotesque as the details are, but to the fact that they’re now officially public. National spokespersons (except for Dick Cheney) can no longer deny, quite so glibly, that the United States is what it claims its enemies to be.

Formal End of Afghanistan War Not Really the End

Once the video loads, the interview with Kathy Kelly begins at the first bubble (around 13:30).

Drone Wars in Afghanistan

by Mary Dobbing

Peace Centre Seminar: photo from VCNV UKPeace Centre Seminar: photo from VCNV UK

Javid asked: “Do you think Afghanistan is singled out as a playground for other countries to wage war in? Were we singled out?”

Jennifer Gibson (Reprieve) said that Afghanistan is a country where wars can be waged without any accountability. ISAF, with UN’s permission, have been carrying out this long war without any accountability. What worries Jennifer is that unaccountable war has happened in Afghanistan for thirteen years and is now being exported. This lack of accountability is now being exported to Iraq and Syria.

First Impressions

by Henrietta Cullinan

…after a good sleep, the bright yellow light streaming across the carpeted floor, I soon grow accustomed to our inside life. In the day I pick up sound cues, the neighbour’s ringtone, the neighbour’s children. I can hear the thud of a football against the wall and scuffling feet in sandals. I distinguish the street cries from the muezzin. The silent gap between our garden wall and the next building is the Kabul river bed…

Street Kids Update

by Maya Evans

Tutoring program for street kids: photo by Maya EvansTutoring program for street kids: photo by Maya Evans

…the last year at the border free centre is her first experience of education; she says learning is important to her, and when she’s older she’d like to become a teacher and help people. I want to know more about Gul Jamma, but can sense a deep sadness which I feel is not my place to disturb. I ask her about toys, her only doll. She says her doll has black hair and wears a scarf but doesn’t help with housework…

The Unspeakable in Afghanistan

by Patrick Kennelly

2014 marks the deadliest year in Afghanistan for civilians, fighters, and foreigners. The situation has reached a new low as the myth of the Afghan state continues. Thirteen years into America’s longest war, the international community argues that Afghanistan is growing stronger, despite nearly all indicators suggesting otherwise. Most recently, the central government failed (again) to conduct fair and organized elections or demonstrate their sovereignty. Instead, John Kerry flew into the country and arranged new national leadership. The cameras rolled and a unity government was declared. Foreign leaders meeting in London decided on new aid packages and financing for the nascent ‘unity government.’ Within days, the United Nations helped broker a deal to keep foreign forces in the country, while simultaneously President Obama declared the war was ending—even as he increased the number of troops on the ground. In Afghanistan, President Ghani dissolved the cabinet and many people are speculating the 2015 parliamentary elections will be postponed.

Syndicate content