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Voices for Creative Nonviolence has deep, long-standing roots in active nonviolent resistance to U.S. war-making. Begun in the summer of 2005, Voices draws upon the experiences of those who challenged the brutal economic sanctions imposed by the U.S. and U.N. against the Iraqi people between 1990 and 2003. More about Voices

recent additions at a glance

Harassing the DronesMary Anne Gragy Flores sentenced to one year for violating order of protection
No to War in Gaza and Afghanistan!New video from APVs- by sharing food, we resist war
Drone Resister Sentenced to One Year in Prison- Base’s Order of Protection Begs JudgmentOn July 10, grandmother of three, Mary Anne Grady Flores was sentenced to one year in prison
Amerikistan, not Afghanistan, Warocracy, not DemocracyHakim speaks of Afghan election, John Kerry's visit and calls for "quit Afghanistan"
Women Rising Radio XXVKathy Kelly interviewed with Sister Stella Soh
Bowe Bergdahl and the Voice of WarBergdahl Listened to Conscience

"Wheatland 4" Trial Ends

The 4 were sentenced to 10 hours of Community Service and a $10 fee Judge Claire warns of harsher consequences next time due to “ban & bar” orders served to them at the time of arrest.

Barry,Toby, Martha, Robin and Bill: the original "Wheatland 5" on April 30, 2013, the morning of their arrestBarry,Toby, Martha, Robin and Bill: the original “Wheatland 5” on April 30, 2013, the morning of their arrest

Fly Kites not Drones

Fly Kites NOT Drones for Now Roz- the Afghan New Year 21-23 March. A campaign launched by Voices for Creative Non Violence UK in solidarity with the Afghan Peace Volunteers who want to end the use of drones. Join us for the joyous Afghan New Year to Fly Kites Not Drones.

Hancock 17 Drone War Crimes Resisters' Verdict Is In

The defendants were prepared for whatever sentence the judge imposed. In the words of Ed Kinane, “Any penalty this court can impose on me is trivial compared to the death sentences imposed on the drone victims.”

Closing Statements

In my opening remarks on December 3, eight weeks ago, I noted that our defense would take two paths: that of conscience and that of legalism.

Our hope remains that this court will move along those two paths, paths bound for justice.

Refugees in their own country

“We are refugees in our own country!” a soft spoken Sunni gentleman said this morning at the site where Fallujans are being housed in Karbala. But he was quick to add, “It is better than being refugees outside our country,” referring to Syria. I had read in the U.S. alternative media that Karbala, a Shia area, was taking in families fleeing the military attacks on their Sunni city, Fallujah. Karbala, a Shia city, is only 90 miles from Fallujah.

Arrival to Karbala

As far as the eye could see, cars, trucks and buses were lined up, 4 and 5 abreast, trying to get through the single-lane checkpoint into Karbala. I would learn later that the night before Iraqi government forces attacked the nearby Sunni city of Fallujah. Karbala, a Shia city with the venerated shrines of Imam Hussein and his brother Abbas, was on high alert fearing retaliation.

Salt and Terror in Afghanistan

The cost of maintaining one U.S. soldier has recently risen to 2.1. million dollars per year. The amount of money spent to keep three U.S. soldiers in Afghanistan in 2014 could almost cover the cost of a four year program to deliver fortified foods to 15 million Afghan people.

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